THE BENEFITS OF A MODERN ROTATIONAL GOLF SWING

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Sumit Aggarwal says:

I am a side cover golfer with a weak right hand grip and find that letting the right elbow go behind me is much easier to swing. I find the one piece takeaway doesn’t work at all for me.

Ned Germany says:

Have you done a release video using Scott aScheffler technique

Ned Germany says:

Great stuff

smoozerish says:

Well explained and right on the money

K. Dickie says:

I love how the 'new' modern swing, complete with the "body release" is the swing Ben Hogan taught in the "Five Lessons the Modern Fundamentals of Golf" Published in 1957. My pro taught it to me in 1967-70. I learned the 'new' modern swing taught by Flick and Toski, which required a lateral hip slide (stall) and snapping the hands through the ball, in the late '70s early 80s. Didn't play as much golf through the 90's and early 2000's. Now I'm relearning the swing I had at the start, just not as flexible or patient as I was when I was 7. 🙂

Ram Narayanan says:

Excellent instruction

Valdy says:

Thanks Dan. I understand now the modern swing.

Diego says:

Those are strange clubs you have

Michael Greer says:

This is absolutely the best video that I have ever seen in so far as explaining the swing. So many videos are showing the old style and the rotational swing. You just eliminated sooooo much confusion in how and what I need to practice. Thank you

Gavin Jason says:

The only down side of this swing is the feeling of cutting in… feel more like pulling out-to-in

Peter says:

Dan, you are a brilliant golf swing analyst. You are able to break down and explain each golf swing movement and its mechanical function in the total swing better than anyone. Thanks for a great lesson.

champy says:

One thing I'd like to add to the comment, below…

You need to be of reasonably good fitness, imho, to be able to execute the modern golf swing (the way the pros do on TV).

The truth of the matter is, your average weekend hacker (which I consider myself to be) will never be able to hit consistently great golf shots because they (we) simply do not have the flexibility, strength and balance to rotate around a stable spine. Maintaining dynamic balance with pinpoint accuracy and body control is like searching for the holy grail for folks over the age of sixty (I'm 62). This is the fallacy, aka, the "bait and switch" of golf instruction. Because, even if you know what needs to be done in a well executed golf swing, if you don't have the legs, ass, back and upper torso to rotate with speed, you will, invariably, hit crappy shots.

Thus, a good instructor's FIRST instruction to every student regardless of age should be, "quit the booze, eat, sensibly, get plenty of rest and exercise/stretch your ass off…if you want to play this game, well."

champy says:

This explains how guys like Jason Day, Bryson Dechambeau and Rory, of course, can blast their drives a country mile…with accuracy! They're focused on maintaining their spine angle, established at address, and rotating around that axis like a bitch out of hell with no conscious manipulation of their hands at any point in their swings.

From this wonderful video, I was finally able to understand why I was constantly hitting fat shots, particularly, with the longer irons and woods. I was slowing my rotation of my body through the hitting zone. By doing so, that alters the orientation of my arms in relation to my spine angle. This explains why the pros always finish in the same beautiful and balanced finish…and, conversely, why I never finish my swing perfectly balanced. The more I focus on maintaining balance and posture and rotating around a steady and stable core, the better my shots are flighting. The two-color baseball bat showed me what I needed to do to execute a proper golf swing and, now, I have an excellent "picture" in my mind's eye of what I want to achieve on every golf single golf shot, regardless, of length! Thank you for sharing this video on youtube, Dan. Great work, my friend!

Jacob R says:

Isnt this game hard enough? Why would you want to go back ON plane then have to turn your body and go upward coming through? This is just fighting gravity! Wouldn't it make more sense to swing back above the plane then let gravity get you back on the plane and swing through? As far as the release what you demonstrate here is a true "flip"! This can be done with ANY type of swing. A release pattern is only 1 component in a golf swing. Not all modern swing golfers turn through and not all classic golfers flip. You can also swing through with your body in a "classic" swing. Jack Nicklaus did not release the way you discuss here. As a matter of fact you use Tiger's dominance as an example. His dominant years were with a"classic" swing and his injury came with Foley("modern" swing). Who hold all the golf records? Classic or modern? Who are the top 20 in the world currently? Lpga, PGA, ASIA, EUROPE, Long drive?

It is 1 way to swing a club sure yet it is NOT easier or more consistent! Disagree? Please provide stats from tours and average amateurs who do this swing without a lot of coaching or maintenance. Look how long Peter Finch has been with you(at least a year) and how much time, effort, money, thought etc… he has put in. His improvement is negligible.

Mark George says:

HehDan! Great work. I'm tall, my height is due to long legs and moderate torso. However, my arms are not real long, I might be giving up an inch to someone my same height. I always wondered why I could get my arms up high enough on the back and now I understand there's a relationship between arms and torso that can only be changed if I force my arms higher, but causing huge corrections in the downswing. I started working on a more rotational swing in early 2018, stayed with it and shot more rounds in the 70's than ever. I let my arms work in concert with my body rotation, arms parallel to shoulders. I use my height to my advantage instead of fighting it. That height creates a wide arc and I compress the heck out of the ball. No more flipping of the club, no more trying to have perfect timing. Your work is outstanding.

Geoffrey Quaile says:

Thanks for this great analysis Dan. I have been struggling with lower left side back pain in my swing. The demonstration with the bat and the old school wrist turn over explains exactly why I have rotational based pain. As I attempt to hold the club face square through impact, I am adding further tension on my lower back by resisting the need for my upper body to turn in the old school fashion. IMO your video does a better job in explaining the source of stress on the back than Brandel Chamblee's recent book. It is easy to see why holding the wrist is more desirable because the timing of turning wrist over is easily missed resulting in an off square face; however, for me, Jason Day and others it is not with out a cost on the lower spine.

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